Windows 10 Licensing Guide

There’s an updated (February 2019) Windows 10 Licensing Guide. The main changes are a Per User Qualifying Operating Systems table added on page 7, and a section on Windows 10 Education Activation added on page 16.

Find this Licensing Guide with hundreds of other Microsoft Licensing Guides that we’ve collected over the years here: http://bit.ly/MSLicensingGuides.

Windows and SQL Server End of Support FAQ

Windows and SQL Server reach the end of mainstream support in July 2019 (SQL) and January 2020 (Windows). Customers who want to continue to run 2008/2008 R2 workloads will have the option of purchasing Extended Security Updates from 1 March, 2019.

There’s a new FAQ from Microsoft which is useful, and if you don’t want to read all 57 questions then focus on question  9 (pricing details), 34 (options for hosted environments), and 37 (how these ESUs will be delivered).

Find this FAQ in the Core Infrastructure section of our Licensing Guides emporium: http://bit.ly/MSLicensingGuides, and add it to your weekend reading list.

Updated Dynamics 365 Licensing Guide

There’s an updated (November 2018) Dynamics 365 Licensing Guide. The main changes are the addition of the Dynamics 365 AI for Sales app (page 15) and some extra clarity around the new Order Lines add-on (page 45). You’ll also notice that some fairly major restructuring has taken place.

Find this guide alongside the rest of the Microsoft Licensing Guides here: http://bit.ly/MSLicensingGuides.

Dynamics 365 Licensing Guide

There’s a new (October 2018) Dynamics 365 Licensing Guide which reflects the changes introduced with the Fall Update. There are changes to Team Members rights, Marketing contacts, and the minimum number of licences required for the included Dynamics 365 portal, and some new SKUs: Customer Service Professional, Microsoft Relationship Sales Solution/Solution Plus, Unified Order Operations – Order Lines, and Talent Comprehensive Hiring.

Find the guide here: http://bit.ly/MSLicensingGuides, and refer to page 1 for a summary table of changes.

Dynamics 365 Licensing Guide

There’s a new (March 2018) Dynamics 365 Licensing Guide covering the licensing of the online versions of the products and incorporating the new Sales Professional User SL and how the new Dynamics 365 for Marketing app is licensed.

From a Dynamics 365 for Sales perspective the new Sales Professional User SL gives access to a subset of the functionality that the Enterprise User SL does, and pages 10/11 give an overview comparison between the two licences while a new Appendix C on page 34 expands on this. It’s also worth knowing that the Sales Enterprise and Sales Professional application modules may not be deployed on the same instance, but may be deployed on the same tenant, and pages 9/10 elaborate on this with some useful diagrams and tables.

You’ll find detail about Dynamics 365 for Marketing on page 10 where it’s explained that this new app is licensed per organisation and is based on the number of contacts in the Customer Engagement database. You can license Dynamics 365 for Marketing as a standalone app or as an add-on to either the Customer Engagement Plan or one of the Customer Engagement apps. In all cases you get an entitlement of 10,000 contacts, and can buy additional contacts in increments of 5,000 if required. The Customer Engagement Plan Applications Use Rights table in Appendix B on page 28 has been updated to include the Marketing app too.

Other changes in this licensing guide include the addition of some useful tables: find additional services and software on page 20, and default instance and infrastructure capability for the Customer Engagement apps on page 22, and for the Unified Operations Plan apps on page 23.

As usual, this guide is added to our ever-growing collection of Microsoft Licensing Guides hosted here: http://bit.ly/MSLicensingGuides.